Category: Shattari books

This contains many biographies of Sufis of Sindh. This manuscript is about the spiritual lessons and stages of the Naqshbandi Sufi path. Read more This contains an Urdu translation with the Turkish text which was translated by Mughal emperor Babur from Farsi.

Another translation of the original Farsi text is also included, as the Persian text was later found. A great book that covers almost every aspect of Dua, including its philosophy, benefits, and lists many prayers of famous people. This is one of the major books written on Sufism in the Indian subcontinent, and some scholars have compared it to the Keemya Saadat of Imam Ghazali. This is an encyclopedia of Sufism written in the 12th century Hijri.

Toggle Navigation. Latest - Maktabah Mujaddidiyah. Subscribe to this RSS feed. Books 0. Radd Mizan-ul-Insaf, a Sindhi book written in refutation of Shia beliefs. Short writings Risail, pl. The earliest source on the life of Hazrat Sayyid Ameer Kulal d. FaLang translation system by Faboba. Like us on Facebook. Maktabah Mujaddidiyah. Latest blog posts Mawlana Waliyunnabi Mujaddidi Naqshbandi d. Mawlana Sayyid Abdus-Salam Haswi d.

Shaykh Muhammad Mazhar Mujaddidi Naqshbandi d. Shaykh Muhammad Umar Mujaddidi Naqshbandi Shaykh Abd ar-Rashid Mujaddidi Naqshbandi With the global spread of Western power and the ensuing decline of indigenous polities in monsoonal Asia throughout the nineteenth century, members of key transregional Sufi brotherhoods, known individually as tariqa from the Arabic word for "way" or "path" and divided by specific techniques and genealogies, engaged in active competition across the Indian Ocean.

This chapter shows how the outcome of contestation between such groups was decided both by their relative connection to the holy cities of Mecca and Medina in the Hijaz, which startlingly swifter modes of steam travel increasingly facilitated, and by the new forms of print technology being engaged at modernizing sites from Istanbul and Cairo to Bombay and Singapore. Certainly this is not a uniquely Southeast Asian story, as can be gathered from Nile Green's Bombay Islam and this volume's chapters 2 by Amal Ghazal and 11 by Homayra Ziadwhich cross the threshold of the twentieth century to show the ongoing repercussions of the use of print in conceptualizing the global umma and its seemingly universal concerns.

Even so, there is still much to be gained by highlighting this region now home to the second-largest concentration of Muslims on earth as a locus of wider social changes that swept across Afrasia, and by seeing how what Green labels "Customary Islam" prepared the way for modernist action. Prior to leaping straight into the Age of Steam and Print, however, it is worth taking brief stock of how Southeast Asia engaged with the umma in the first place.

Certainly Islam came late to the region. It was only from around the thirteenth century that the rulers of the many polities that dotted the sprawling archipelagic crossroads adopted the faith of some of the great dynasties to the West, joining a religious tradition whose adherents had long been found in the cosmopolitan ports of southern India and China and taking on a universal system of script, titulature, and rituals that connected every believer to the focal node of Mecca and the example of the Prophet.

By the time Europeans began to arrive in Southeast Asia in the sixteenth century in quest of the lucrative spices of the famed Moluccan archipelago, they found a network of Muslim-dominated ports, stretching almost the whole way from India to China, where daily prayers were a regular part of popular praxis.

Europeans also saw how the mosques built from Aceh in the west to Ternate and Manila in the east acted as sites of instruction in the basic principles of belief and, for those with the financial capacity and time, instruction in the texts of Islamic jurisprudence intended to regulate all aspects of social congress. That said, beyond the occasional observation in later European sources of prayer beads in the hands of local rulers and visiting scholars, whether Malays, Egyptians, or even Rumis as many Turkic speakers were knownwe have little clear sense of what role the Sufi tariqas played in the process of conversion and then in the maintenance of Mecca-conscious orthodoxy.

Still, struck by the powerful weight of evidence from later periods, coupled with the crucial observations of missionaries in the nineteenth century, Orientalist scholars of the high colonial era began to suspect that some sort of pantheistic Indic Sufism must once have provided inspiration for converts eager to throw off the old faiths of their ancestors, which an inherently austere faith of the Arabian desert supplanted. Hence any aspirant mystic worth his or her salt claimed a connection to both cities, as indeed did many Southeast Asian Muslims, whom Arabic speakers knew collectively as Jawa and individually as Jawi.

The latter term remains in use today, to designate Arabic-script Malay, a language that has long served as the key scholarly link of the archipelago. From the seventeenth century at the latest, Jawi sojourners supported by their distant sovereigns would often return home with the latest or supposedly purest form of Meccan knowledge, embodied for the elect in Sufi tariqa rituals.

These rites were often differentiated by the manner of their dhikr remembrance of God and the specific silsila chain of authority that allowed their brotherhoods to assert that such practices had been sanctioned by the Prophet, whose mantle so many local rulers claimed as exclusive protectors of the faith. The orders furthermore at times policed the spread of alleged heterodoxy within the community at large, challenging any rival mystical teachers as flouters of the law and enablers of sin, especially if they could be shown to be heedless propounders of the doctrine of the Wujudiyya, which posited an essential indivisibility of God and creation wujud.

Scholars often situate such campaigns within a long history of Islamic "reformism," as the trend of policing the public bounds of belief is often termed. This was clearly the case with the spread of the Shattariyya in seventeenth-century Aceh and then of the Egyptian-oriented Sammaniyya in eighteenth-century Palembang, farther south on the Sumatran coast.

However, as we shall see, matters would change, and quite radically, given that the Age of Steam and Print overlapped and served to define what I term an inherently populist Sufi century. It is equally worth noting that even if the genealogies of Islamic reformism allow us to connect the scholarly dots between eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Jawi and Arab intellectuals moving on the transoceanic paths linking the port of Makassar on Sulawesi, say, with Shihr in Yemen or even with Sri Lanka and the Cape of Good Hope, the sources say little of peoples outside the courts.

Popular participation in Sufi movements seems to appear only when particular teachers are finally wedded by the teleology of nationalist historiography to what are now cast as anticolonial struggles against the Dutch, who had usurped, and thereby united, much of the Southeast Asian archipelago by the First World War.

An oft-cited example of a specifically Sufi struggle in quest of "national" independence is the so-called Banten Jihad, which broke out in the West Javanese town of Cilegon in By starting with the Padri events on Sumatra and moving forward in time in the region at large, beyond the period of the revival of Sufi fortunes at Mecca after the Ottoman-backed expulsion of the Wahhabiyya inone can see that the new populist push exacerbated intertariqa contestation in Southeast Asia, especially on the neighboring isle of Java.

I also note that such Sufi challengers harnessed the crucial means of modern modes of travel and the transmission of knowledge through printing by the s, inadvertently laying the groundwork for the expansion of the Salafiyya movement that-as may be seen in chapters 2, 3, and finally condemned so much Sufi-related activity as backward heterodoxy.

He could appeal to long local precedent in this respect, though matters had not always been thus. In what seems an unrelated diversion in his book, Abdul Manaf writes of how the Shattari Sufi lineage once prevailed in West Sumatra, after the sainted Burhan al-Din established it at the town of Ulakan at the end of the seventeenth century.

Abdul Manaf makes this interpolation to point out that whereas the various scholarly descendants of Burhan al-Din used calculation for determining most dates, they preferred observation of the crescent moon to mark the commencement of the fasting month of Ramadan. However, the arrival of the rival Naqshbandi Sufi order in the highlands around shattered the regional consensus.

On the face of it, here we have recorded memories of a specific date signaling the introduction of the Naqshbandiyya in West Sumatra and the outline of a doctrinal difference that separated them, quite publicly, from their Shattari rivals.

After all, the start of the fast a day early or late is a profound marker of social distance in Muslim societies. Yet there are problems with taking Abdul Manaf's modern account at face value, for a yawning gulf of decades separates it from the events it describes.

I also suggest that it backdates later doctrinal concerns that overlaid and amplified earlier political ones. Indeed, it is clear from an account written in the s by Shaykh Kota Tua's immediate successor, Faqih Saghir also known as Jalal al-Din Ahmad of Samiangthat his master had been a leading proponent of the Shattariyya and had instituted a program in the s for the eradication not of Wujudi ideology but of the popular social practices of cock fighting, gambling, tooth filing, and consuming opium and alcohol.

In the process he and his agents stirred up the remnants of the royal family and their supporters at Ulakan. Hostilities soon commenced in what its participants long knew as "the war of religion," whose partisans some ulama agitators termed "white ones" like themselves and "black ones. This all began beyond the gaze of most Europeans, who were in the process of reassigning parts of the region for exploitation in the wake of the Napoleonic Wars. When the British based at nearby Bencoolen Bengkulu started to hear about the new movement and the violence it initiated, they cast it as led by Mecca-inspired returnees and preachers, whom they dubbed "Padres" or "Padris.

A full-scale uprising on Java led by Prince Dipanagara of Yogyakarta c. In what became known as the Java WarDipanagara called on the island's expanding community of self-declared white ones in a war against the court and the Dutch, whose power supported it.Published by Oxford University Press, Incorporated.

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More information about this seller Contact this seller 8. First Edition Thus. May not include working access code. Will not include dust jacket. Has used sticker s and some writing or highlighting.This banner text can have markup. Search the history of over billion web pages on the Internet. Media Type Media Type. Sep 24, by Shah Saifullah Qadiri. Sep 17, by Kazmi Shattari Al Qadri. Sep 6, Jul 6, by Ghulam Dastagir Misbahi. Jul 6, by Nafees Ahmad Misbahi.

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shattari books

Aug 4, by Muhammad Bin Fazlullah Burhanpuri. Topic: Malfuzat Shattari Tarikh Sufi.The Shattariyya are members of a Sufi mystical order tariqah that originated in Persia in the fifteenth century C. Later secondary branches were taken to Hejaz and Indonesia.

The word Shattarwhich means "lightning-quick","speed","rapidity", [1] or "fast-goer" [2] indicates a system of spiritual practices that lead quickly to a state of "completion", [3] however the name derives from its founder, Sheikh Sirajuddin Abdullah Shattar d. Unlike other Sufis the Shattariyya do not subscribe to the concept of fana annihilation of the ego. True to its name shattari mode is the quickest. On entering shattari path the master Pir lifts the disciple Mureed from the base Maaqam station of Shariyat and promotes him to Tariqat in one go.

Then depending upon capacity of each disciple, he is carefully guided and made to progress through advanced stages of Haqiqat and Maarifat. Any breach of trust and misuse of this knowledge is a greatest of all sins. The Noble spiritual lineage Silsila of this order is an un-interrupted chain of divine energies flowing through selected enlightened soul. Like that of the Naqshbandiyyathe Shattari succession or chain of transmission silsila is said to pass from the Prophet Muhammad through Bayazid Bastami CE.

Shattar was deputized and given the honorific "Shattar" by his teacher Sheikh Muhammad Taifur in recognition of the austerities he faced in achieving this station maqam. Originating in Persiathe order and its teachings were later brought to India by Sheikh Abdullah Shattar.

He used to judge disciples even with their eating habits and would extend his teachings only to those who did proper justice to the food. Dressed in royal robes he used to travel on streets beating drums and openly invite people to witness God in his presence, wandering from one monastery to another, and made known the method.

His procedure was to approach the chief of a Sufi group and say, 'Teach me your method, share it with me. If you will not, I invite you to share mine. This Village is situated on the banks of Ganga River. He was third son of Hazrat Allauddin Kaazan Shattari. Famous Mughal Emperor Humayun was a dedicated follower of Hazrat Abul Fatah Hidayatullah Sarmast and took his advice on worldly, political and spiritual issues.

A future successor was Wajihuddin Alvi d. He was born in Champaneran ancient city of Eastern Gujarat. He latter moved to Ahmedabad where he received and latter imparted knowledge in Islamic studies.

He became a prominent scholar of his times and became a Mufti. Royals of that time came to him for opinion on complex religious issues. He lived a simple life and always kept humble profile. He used to share whatever came to him with the poor and the needy.The Shattariyya are members of a Sufi mystical tariqah that originated in Persia in the fifteenth century C.

Later secondary branches were taken to Hejaz and Indonesia. The word Shattarwhich means "lightning-quick", "speed", "rapidity", [1] or "fast-goer" [2] indicates a system of spiritual practices that lead quickly to a state of "completion", [3] however the name derives from its founder, Sheikh Sirajuddin Abdullah Shattar d.

Unlike other Sufis the Shattariyya do not subscribe to the concept of fana annihilation of the ego. True to its name shattari mode is the quickest.

shattari books

On entering shattari path the master Pir lifts the disciple Mureed from the base Maaqam station of Shariyat and promotes him to Tariqat in one go. Then depending upon capacity of each disciple, he is carefully guided and made to progress through advanced stages of Haqiqat and Maarifat.

Any breach of trust and misuse of this knowledge is the greatest of all sins Gunaah-e-Kabira. The spiritual lineage of this order is a chain of transmission silsila said to pass from Muhammad through Bayazid Bastami CE. Shattar was deputized and given the honorific "Shattar" by his teacher Sheikh Muhammad Taifur in recognition of the austerities he faced in achieving this station maqam.

Originating in Persiathe order and its teachings were later brought to India by Sheikh Abdullah Shattar. He used to judge disciples even with their eating habits and would extend his teachings only to those who did proper justice to the food.

Dressed in royal robes he used to travel on streets beating drums and openly invite people to witness God in his presence, wandering from one monastery to another, and made known the method. His procedure was to approach the chief of a Sufi group and say, 'Teach me your method, share it with me. If you will not, I invite you to share mine.

Journey of Hazrat Sufi Saeed Ali Shah - Sufi Shattari

Khilafat was further passed on to Abul Fatah Hidayatullah Sarmast d 12th Shawwal hijri His shrine is located in a small village near Vaishali, Hajipur, around 20 kilometers from PatnaBihar. This Village is situated on the banks of Ganga River.

He was third son of Allauddin Kaazan Shattari. Famous Mughal Emperor Humayun was a dedicated follower of Abul Fatah Hidayatullah Sarmast and took his advice on worldly, political and spiritual issues.

A future successor was Wajihuddin Alvi d. He was born in Champaneran ancient city of Eastern Gujarat. He latter moved to Ahmedabad where he received and latter imparted knowledge in Islamic studies. He became a prominent scholar of his times and became a Mufti. Royals of that time came to him for opinion on complex religious issues.Seller Rating:.

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